David
Chancellor

on assignment – The Matthews (or Mathews) Range..

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dawn # II, the mathews range, northern kenya from ‘with butterflies and warriors’

 

In the 1970’s there were elephant, black rhino and Grevy zebra in abundance throughout the vast northern frontier district of Kenya. In 1977, Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda announced a ban on all forms of game hunting and as the hunting parties withdrew, so the lawless bandits from Somalia moved in.

By 1984 there were no rhino left in the Mathews range of Kenya. Elephant numbers had dwindled to a few scattered herds running from thicket to thicket in fear of their lives, and the beautiful Grevy zebra had been eliminated; more than 30,000 animals poached in just eight years. It was uncertain whether any black rhinos would survive in Kenya. Poaching for horn had reduced Kenya’s rhinos from some 20,000 in the mid-1970s to a few hundred by 1986.

 

looking towards the mathews range at dawn, northern kenya from ‘with butterflies and warriors’

 

storm clouds over northern kenya from ‘with butterflies and warriors’

 

aircraft interior, sera community conservancy, northern kenya from ‘with butterflies and warriors’

 

Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid for @geomagazin of The Matthews (or Mathews) Range, also known as the Lenkiyio Hills, northern Kenya - the area is isolated, and holds forests of juniper and cycads. It is home to elephants and other large mammals, and was one of the last places in northern Kenya to have wild Black Rhinos. The last Black Rhino in the Mathew's was poached out in the 1990s. The Mathew's are also home to the Samburu people. The mountain range is a sky island, surrounded by plains, with Ndoto Mountains to the north and the Karisia hills to the west. Sky islands are isolated mountains surrounded by radically different lowland environments. Such isolation has significant implications for these natural habitats. A number of the species in the Mathew's have evolved independently and the diversity of the high altitude forest is of great conservation value. I’m indebted to Jeremy and Katie @sararacamp @katie.rowe for flying me round these mountains well before the sun was up on several occasions - I’ll be working in this incredible part of the world for the next few weeks #conserving #conservation #kenya #northernkenya #samburu #nopoaching #lion #withbutterfliesandwarriors @ewasolions

dawn, the mathews range, northern kenya from ‘with butterflies and warriors’

Also known as the Lenkiyio Hills this area is isolated, and holds forests of juniper and cycads. It is still thankfully home to elephants and other large mammals, and was one of the last places in northern Kenya to offer shelter to wild Black Rhinos. The Mathew’s are also home to the Samburu people.

The mountain range is a sky island, surrounded by plains, with Ndoto Mountains to the north and the Karisia hills to the west. Sky islands are isolated mountains surrounded by radically different lowland environments. Such isolation has significant implications for these natural habitats. A number of the species in the Mathew’s have evolved independently and the diversity of the high altitude forest is of great conservation value.

I’m indebted to Jeremy and Katie @sararacamp @katie.rowe for flying me round these mountains well before the sun was up on several occasions – I’ll be working in this incredible part of the world for the next few weeks

#conserving #conservation #kenya #northernkenya #samburu #nopoaching #lion #withbutterfliesandwarriors @ewasolions

found abandoned weaver bird nest..

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found abandoned weaver bird nest, constructed out of telephone cable, wire, plastic, and grass - northern Kenya - typically it is the male weaver bird that builds the nest to woo the females. If she is suitably impressed then the nest will be adopted. The nests have a flask shaped chamber entered via the thin tube at the bottom, with a narrow entrance facing downwards to defend against any possible predators - turn your phone through 90 degrees clockwise and that’s how it hangs. Kind of like the industrial, sort of retro hairdryer look of it this way though. #kenya #northernkenya #weavers #weaverbirds #nests #conserving #conservation #africa

Constructed out of telephone cable, wire, plastic, and grass – northern Kenya – typically it is the male weaver bird that builds the nest to woo the females. If she is suitably impressed then the nest will be adopted. The nests have a flask shaped chamber entered via the thin tube at the bottom, with a narrow entrance facing downwards to defend against any possible predators – turn your phone through 90 degrees clockwise and that’s how it hangs. Kind of like the industrial, sort of retro hairdryer look of it this way though.

#kenya #northernkenya #weavers #weaverbirds #nests #conserving #conservation #africa

on assignment -with Kenya Wildlife Services and rangers at the site of a leopard trap..

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Photographs by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - Kenya Wildlife Services and rangers arrive at the site of a leopard trap set the day before (see image 2) - ngare ndare forest reserve northern Kenya - leopards increasingly come into contact with villages in northern Kenya. As human populations expand so does the amount of domestic livestock which presents easy pickings for such an efficient predator as a leopard. This community was regularly and increasingly loosing large numbers of sheep and goats. There first point of contact was the community rangers who in turn notified KWS of the problem; left unattended the villagers would undoubtedly take the situation into their own hands and kill the leopard. KWS had a specialist team who trapped the leopard and relocated to an area far from human habitation. This is a reoccurring problem as we expand our presence across the globe and conflict with wildlife habitats. Previously the community would see no benefit from living alongside wildlife in this region of northern Kenya, now due to the increase of community based conservation, in some cases they are actually able to see the benefit of maintaining the wildlife and thus, an enemy of the wildlife becomes an enemy of the people - Thanks here to the good work of Kenya Wildlife Services @kenyawildlifeservice and the rangers of @nrt_kenya - to see more of my work and projects follow me here @chancellordavid @natgeo @thephotosociety and @everydayextinction #nopoaching #conserving #leopard

Kenya Wildlife Services and rangers arrive at the site of a leopard trap set the day before – Ngare Ndare Forest Reserve northern Kenya – leopards increasingly come into contact with villages in northern Kenya. As human populations expand so does the amount of domestic livestock which presents easy pickings for such an efficient predator as a leopard. This community was regularly and increasingly loosing large numbers of sheep and goats. There first point of contact was the community rangers who in turn notified KWS of the problem; left unattended the villagers would undoubtedly take the situation into their own hands and kill the leopard. KWS had a specialist team who trapped the leopard and relocated to an area far from human habitation. This is a reoccurring problem as we expand our presence across the globe and conflict with wildlife habitats. Previously the community would see no benefit from living alongside wildlife in this region of northern Kenya, now due to the increase of community based conservation, in some cases they are actually able to see the benefit of maintaining the wildlife and thus, an enemy of the wildlife becomes an enemy of the people.

@everydayextinction work featured in the Guardian.

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The Guardian have featured @everydayextinction this week on their website. I’m delighted to be supporting and contributing work to this feed. This is an exciting development for the feed and brings the message about the global biodiversity extinction crisis to the publication's substantial audience. Increasing dialogue in the mainstream media about this issue was one of our initial goals and we're starting to make headway in this area. Thanks, as ever, to all the contributors and supporters who are making this a success, but most of all to @seangallagher who’s selfless work and dedication has got us to this point -@everydayextinction features the work from 25 wildlife photographers, photojournalists and scientists, we aim to highlight species extinction and celebrate this wonderful planets biodiversity. Please follow the feed @everydayextinction - extinction is forever - here’s a link to the gallery on the Guardian site - https://www.theguardian.com/environment/gallery/2018/feb/07/instagram-feed-shows-everyday-extinction-in-pictures - ..................Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - A member of Lewa Conservancies @lewa_wildlife specialist anti poaching team stands guard over a black rhino killed moments earlier by poachers. Due to the extremely fast response of the security teams the poachers fled the scene without recovering the rhino’s horn. The threat from poaching has put rhino populations across the continent under immense pressure. For conservancies, national and private reserves that hold any rhino, the key to ensuring the survival of their populations, and in effect the species, is the provision of adequate security. Since this incident in 2013 the conservancy has not lost a single rhino to poaching. Lewa's success in rhino conservation can greatly be attributed to the efficiency, discipline and timely intervention of its security teams - in 2014, a record 1,215 rhinos were slaughtered for their horns in South Africa - and at the same time, 42 poachers were killed by rangers and police. This bloody conflict is fuelled by the mistaken belief in Asia that rhino horn cures cancer, and it's growing more intense every year #nopoaching

I’m delighted to be supporting and contributing work to this feed. This is an exciting development for the feed and brings the message about the global biodiversity extinction crisis to the publication’s substantial audience. Increasing dialogue in the mainstream media about this issue was one of our initial goals and we’re starting to make headway in this area. Thanks, as ever, to all the contributors and supporters who are making this a success, but most of all to @sean_gallagher_photo who’s selfless work and dedication has got us to this point – @everydayextinction features the work from 25 wildlife photographers, photojournalists and scientists, we aim to highlight species extinction and celebrate this wonderful planets biodiversity. Please follow the feed @everydayextinction – extinction is forever – here’s a link to the gallery on the Guardian site – https://www.theguardian.com/environment/gallery/2018/feb/07/instagram-feed-shows-everyday-extinction-in-pictures

The image here shows a member of Lewa Conservancies @lewa_wildlife specialist anti poaching team standing guard over a black rhino killed moments earlier by poachers, and is from continued work from the project #withbutterfliesand warriors – Due to the extremely fast response of the security teams, the poachers fled the scene without recovering the rhino’s horn. The threat from poaching has put rhino populations across the continent under immense pressure. For conservancies, national and private reserves that hold any rhino, the key to ensuring the survival of their populations, and in effect the species, is the provision of adequate security. Since this incident in 2013 the conservancy has not lost a single rhino to poaching. Lewa’s success in rhino conservation can greatly be attributed to the efficiency, discipline and timely intervention of its security teams – in 2014, a record 1,215 rhinos were slaughtered for their horns in South Africa – and at the same time, 42 poachers were killed by rangers and police. This bloody conflict is fueled by the mistaken belief in Asia that rhino horn cures cancer, and it’s growing more intense every year #nopoaching