David
Chancellor

I’m delighted to be working with @everydayextinction

News
a rhino calf removed from the lifeless body of its poached mother, northern Kenya -from work documenting community conservation #withbutterfliesandwarriors - I’m delighted to be working with @everydayextinction - conceived by @sean_gallagher_photo the aim of this new feed is to highlight the causes, effects and solutions to the current 6th mass extinction of global biodiversity. This is a vitally important issue but still vastly underreported. We are currently a group of around 25 contributing photographers who use their powerful work to highlight the conflict between man and nature, such as @patrickbrownphoto @paulhiltonphoto @adriansteirn @amivitale and many others..Three years ago, author Elizabeth Kolbert argued that Earth was experiencing its sixth extinction — an accelerated and global phenomenon characterized by the mass disappearance of entire species. The planet experienced five such mass events in its history, including at the end of Permian Age, commonly associated with the end of the dinosaur era. But, Kolbert writes, the sixth extinction is distinct from all its predecessors: It’s the first one caused by man. In the past 100 years, some of the 177 most common mammals have lost 30 percent or more of their geographic ranges and more than 40% of the species have experienced severe population declines. Sean feels that this mass extinction ‘event' remains largely unknown among the general public. The issue is covered from time to time in mainstream media, but it isn’t getting the attention it so desperately needs. I think he’s bang on, so on here you’ll find some of those stories; it’s not import ant to like them, it is important to be aware of them !! please follow @everydayextinction and on our own feeds @chancellordavid and @natgeo etc..there is also a selection of images shared on the @buzzfeedphoto account today..and we’ll be guesting on other accounts in due course..#everydayextinction #wildlife #africa #rhino #stoppoaching #kenya #endextinction

A rhino calf removed from the lifeless body of its poached mother, northern Kenya -from work documenting community conservation #withbutterfliesandwarriors

@everydayextinction – conceived by Sean Gallagher, the aim of this new feed is to highlight the causes, effects and solutions to the current 6th mass extinction of global biodiversity.

This is a vitally important issue but still vastly under reported.

We are currently a group of around 25 contributing photographers who use their powerful work to highlight the conflict between man and nature.

Three years ago, author Elizabeth Kolbert argued that Earth was experiencing its sixth extinction — an accelerated and global phenomenon characterized by the mass disappearance of entire species. The planet experienced five such mass events in its history, including at the end of Permian Age, commonly associated with the end of the dinosaur era. But, Kolbert writes, the sixth extinction is distinct from all its predecessors: It’s the first one caused by man.

In the past 100 years, some of the 177 most common mammals have lost 30 percent or more of their geographic ranges and more than 40% of the species have experienced severe population declines. Sean feels that this mass extinction ‘event’ remains largely unknown among the general public. The issue is covered from time to time in mainstream media, but it isn’t getting the attention it so desperately needs. I think he’s bang on, so on this feed you’ll find some of those stories; it’s not important to like them, it is important to be aware of them !!

The skeleton of a dodo (raphus cucullatus) from the 16th century (or possibly earlier)

News
photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - the skeleton of a dodo (raphus cucullatus) from the 16th century (or possibly earlier) During the month of September in the year 1598 a flotilla of ships belonging to the Dutch East India Company drew close to a mysterious island far out in the Indian Ocean. As far as anyone knows, no human had ever set foot on it, those who came ashore found themselves in a land of reptiles and birds: the only mammals were those that could fly or swim there. Birds were everywhere, one in particular stood out - a large fat creature equipped with an enormous beak; and so, man’s relationship with the dodo began. As we now know the relationship didn’t go well for the dodo. After many months at sea the birds presented a tasty alternative to the sailors usual diet; the birds couldn’t fly, they had no need to, they had no predators, so the catching was comparatively easy. With man came dogs, cats, monkeys, pigs, and rats. All preyed rapaciously on the birds and their eggs. By the year 1680 (or possibly earlier) the dodo was gone. All that was left were one or two poorly stuffed examples, a series of paintings, most of them produced by a dutch artist called Roelandt Savery, and a few written descriptions. So, less than 100 years after its discovery, the dodo passed into history. Over the next two centuries the dodo became something of a footnote in the tale of natural history. Some naturalists even began to deny that it had existed. Then during the 1860’s a great collection of bones arrived in London, all of them from the dodo. These had been found in a marsh on Mauritius by a school master, Charles Clarke. He had sent workers into water at the centre of the marsh, about 3ft deep, where bones had begun to turn up. Feeling with their naked feet they discovered the bones of many dodo’s. From these bones London’s Natural History Museum was able to assemble an almost complete skeleton. A very few reasonably complete skeletons have, over the years been assembled from these bones. From this time onwards the dodo’s rise to become one of the the great icons of extinction was as unstoppable as its demise at the hand of man #everydayextinction

During the month of September in the year 1598 a flotilla of ships belonging to the Dutch East India Company drew close to a mysterious island far out in the Indian Ocean. As far as anyone knows, no human had ever set foot on it, those who came ashore found themselves in a land of reptiles and birds: the only mammals were those that could fly or swim there. Birds were everywhere, one in particular stood out – a large fat creature equipped with an enormous beak; and so, man’s relationship with the dodo began.

As we now know the relationship didn’t go well for the dodo. After many months at sea the birds presented a tasty alternative to the sailors usual diet; the birds couldn’t fly, they had no need to, they had no predators, so the catching was comparatively easy. With man came dogs, cats, monkeys, pigs, and rats. All preyed rapaciously on the birds and their eggs.

By the year 1680 (or possibly earlier) the dodo was gone. All that was left were one or two poorly stuffed examples, a series of paintings, most of them produced by a dutch artist called Roelandt Savery, and a few written descriptions. So, less than 100 years after its discovery, the dodo passed into history.

Over the next two centuries the dodo became something of a footnote in the tale of natural history. Some naturalists even began to deny that it had existed. Then during the 1860’s a great collection of bones arrived in London, all of them from the dodo. These had been found in a marsh on Mauritius by a school master, Charles Clarke. He had sent workers into water at the centre of the marsh, about 3ft deep, where bones had begun to turn up. Feeling with their naked feet they discovered the bones of many dodo’s. From these bones London’s Natural History Museum was able to assemble an almost complete skeleton.

A very few reasonably complete skeletons have, over the years been assembled from these bones.

From this time onwards the dodo’s rise to become one of the the great icons of extinction was as unstoppable as its demise at the hand of man.

In northern Kenya at Mpala research centre, catching vulturine guineafowl for a research project

News
catching vulturine guineafowl for a research project, Mpala research centre, northern Kenya - photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - The name of the vulturine guineafowl (Acryllium vulturinum) comes from its bald head and neck, which is similar to a vulture's. They have a range throughout North East Africa and can be found in the grasslands, savannahs and scrublands of Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, Tanzania and Uganda.Using their beak and claws to dig and scratch for food, vulturine guineafowl forage for fruit, grubs, insects, roots, seeds, tubers and vegetation. Due to their dry environment, water is not always readily available to them but they can survive for long periods without drinking and are able to obtain all their liquid requirements from their food. Although they can fly well, vulturine guineafowl spend the majority of their time on the ground and prefer to flee from danger on foot rather than fly away. They are able to call to each other over long distances, not only to warn of danger but also to call the flock together to roost. Although they live together in large flocks, vulturine guineafowl can become aggressive and injure each other if food becomes scare or roosting sites become crowded. This is not just limited to adult birds; chicks will also fight each other for food. There is currently very little information on the vulture guinea fowl as a species and researchers are currently observing the birds, their associations, and construction of social networks here at Mpala research centre, northern Kenya. To see more of my work and projects follow me here @chancellordavid and @natgeo #conservation #conserving #northernkenya #kenya

There is currently very little information on the vulture guinea fowl as a species and researchers are currently observing the birds, their associations, and construction of social networks here at Mpala research centre, northern Kenya.

This is what we know..

The name of the vulturine guineafowl (Acryllium vulturinum) comes from its bald head and neck, which is similar to a vulture’s.

They have a range throughout North East Africa and can be found in the grasslands, savannahs and scrublands of Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, Tanzania and Uganda.

Using their beak and claws to dig and scratch for food, vulturine guineafowl forage for fruit, grubs, insects, roots, seeds, tubers and vegetation.

Due to their dry environment, water is not always readily available to them but they can survive for long periods without drinking and are able to obtain all their liquid requirements from their food.

Although they can fly well, vulturine guineafowl spend the majority of their time on the ground and prefer to flee from danger on foot rather than fly away. They are able to call to each other over long distances, not only to warn of danger but also to call the flock together to roost.

Although they live together in large flocks, vulturine guineafowl can become aggressive and injure each other if food becomes scare or roosting sites become crowded. This is not just limited to adult birds; chicks will also fight each other for food.

Rest in Peace Clint…

News
I lost someone today. I think we all lost a someone today actually. I met Clint last year whilst working on a story in Utah on mountain lion. He sadly passed away today. He made the world a better place. Those who knew him well, those who spent most time with him in the mountains where he was so at home will miss him more, I'm certain of that, as will the predators he dedicated his life to. Clint, I hope you too can be wrapped in your favourite jacket and buried in the mountains exactly as you honoured the lives of all the dogs who rode with you. Too soon sir. Way too soon. Thank you for the rides out - -In the quiet of the morning when the sky is clear and whiteand dawn's soft hush has slipped across the solitude of night,When the last pale star has fallen and the East’s a rosy glow, streaked with lavenders and orchids with a touch of indigo.When the colors all are blending, there is no defining each,And the sun peeps up appearing Like some plump and pinkish peach,There is nothing quite so moving, quite so silent, quite so strange as the Lord's most recent wonder— birth of morning on the range.I can't quite seem to fathom— I can't help wondering why—I was placed amongst such beauty, all this solitude and sky. Now, I see you ride before me, as my feet trod earthly sod,I watch you vanish in the sunrise. Go with God!

I lost someone today.

I think we all lost a someone today actually.

I met Clint last year whilst working on a National Geographic story in Utah on mountain lion. He sadly passed away today.

Clint was one of those people who actually made the world a better place. Those who knew him well, those who spent most time with him in the mountains where he was so at home, will miss him more, I’m certain of that, as will the predators he dedicated his life to.

Clint, I hope you too can be wrapped in your favourite jacket and buried in the mountains exactly as you honoured the lives of all the dogs who rode with you. Too soon sir. Way too soon.

Thank you for the rides out.

‘In the quiet of the morning when the sky is clear and white and dawn’s soft hush has slipped across the solitude of night.

When the last pale star has fallen and the East’s a rosy glow, streaked with lavenders and orchids with a touch of indigo.

When the colors all are blending, there is no defining each, and the sun peeps up appearing like some plump and pinkish peach.

There is nothing quite so moving, quite so silent, quite so strange as the Lord’s most recent wonder, the birth of morning on the range.

I can’t quite seem to fathom, I can’t help wondering why, I was placed amongst such beauty, all this solitude and sky.

Now, I see you ride before me, as my feet trod earthly sod, I watch you vanish in the sunrise.

Go with God

The dodo..found this in an auctioneers desk draw, will return for the full skeleton

News
dodo skull-photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - more words have been written about the dodo than any other extinct animal. Yet the truth is that almost nothing is known of this strange creature. The bird lived only on the small isolated island of Mauritius way out in the Indian Ocean. The first mention of it comes in a book published in 1599. Around 60 years later the species was extinct. What survives from this brief period of interaction with human beings is very little. Some 15 written accounts (most of which are disappointing) a similar number of paintings, a large pile of bones, and a stuffed head and foot. #dodo #fightingextinction #nopoaching #conserving #conservation #wildlife

More words have been written about the dodo than any other extinct animal. Yet the truth is that almost nothing is known of this strange creature. The bird lived only on the small isolated island of Mauritius way out in the Indian Ocean. The first mention of it comes in a book published in 1599. Around 60 years later the species was extinct. What survives from this brief period of interaction with human beings is very little. Some 15 written accounts (most of which are disappointing) a similar number of paintings, a large pile of bones, and a stuffed head and foot.